WOTY 2.4: Latino Youth

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WOTY 2.4: Latino Youth

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
2180 3rd Avenue
New York, NY

Through September 27

Latino Youth is a portrait series by the Nicaraguan born artist Lola Sandino Stanton. The series depicts a personal reflection on young latinos, some of whom were former students of Stanton’s. The subjects are captured at the moment of discovering their own voice at a pivotal time in their lives. Each painting portrays a symbolic blackbird native to the artist’s home country of Nicaragua, known as a “Zanate”.

Traditionally a black bird represents a malevolent force although in Stanton’s work, the Zanate symbolizes the arrival of guidance, protection, and creativity in the lives of the youth. Stanton is aware of the challenges that most young latinos confront growing up, including immigration struggles, language barriers, and cultural norms that do not reflect their cultural upbringing or beliefs. For these reasons she chose to represent an empowered image of young latinos, unlocking their inner voice and bolstering them into a confident position.

For latinos, the current moment in the United States is one of the most hostile in history with new migratory reform and the zero tolerance policy at the Mexico border separating families and this makes the series “Latino Youth” all the more urgent. Lola Sandino Stanton brings an image of a strong latino youth community — one that is proud of their heritage and rising to have their voices heard.

Thomas Allen Harris: Mother, Bethel, Harlem, USA

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Thomas Allen Harris: Mother, Bethel, Harlem, USA

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
2180 3rd Avenue
New York, NY

Opening August 31

Mother, Bethel, Harlem, USA is an exhibition project by artist and filmmaker Thomas Allen Harris. Harris will work in collaboration with students from the Hunter College IMA MFA program to build an interactive exhibition at Hunter East Harlem Gallery. Drawing from found, generated, and reimagined archives, as seen in Harris’ project Digital Diaspora Family Reunion, students will remix and expand the archive within the gallery space using methodologies that Harris has been pioneering for the over 25 years in his socially engaged, participatory, and experimental creative practice. Since 2009, through his project Digital Diaspora, Harris has collected over 3,000 interviews and stories where the photograph is the central launchpad for personal narrative. The materials and documentation from Digital Diaspora are interwoven with Harris’ family archive, sourced largely from the Harlem-based church First AME Church: Bethel.

Investigations into historical visual materials like family albums, vintage photographs, archival film, and personal narratives become central to the development of Mother, Bethel, Harlem, USA. These archival materials illuminate the neighborhood’s stories, giving shape to a history sourced directly from its residents. The result is a dynamic exploration into themes of collective memory, transference, and renewal within movements and communities. Throughout July and August, gallery visitors and passersby are invited to add their voices to the ongoing performance of the archive inside the gallery. The final outcome is a collaborative exhibition inside the gallery during the month of September 2018.

Axis Mundo Closing Weekend Events

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Closing Weekend Events for Axis Mundo: Zine Fair, Panel Discussion, T-Shirt Making, and Reception

 
205 Hudson Gallery
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY

August 18, 1-7pm

1-7pm / Zine fair
with The Bettys, Discipline Press, Luna Rio, Precog Magazine, Cósmica, Sula Collective, and 3 Dot Zine

2-3:15pm / Panel discussion
with Joey Terrill, Rudy Garcia, Tamara Santibanez, and Kameelah Janan Rasheed

4pm / T-shirt making workshop with Joey Terrill

6-7pm / Closing Reception

Axis Mundo presents over two decades of work—painting, performance ephemera, print material, video, music, fashion, and photography—in the context of significant artistic and cultural movements: mail art and artist correspondences; the rise of Chicanx, LGBTQ, and feminist print media; the formation of alternative spaces; fashion culture; punk music and performance; and artistic responses to the AIDS crisis. As a result of thorough curatorial research, Axis Mundo marks the first historical consideration and significant showing of many of these pioneering artists’ work.

Visual AIDS Talk + Tour of Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A.

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Tuesday, July 17, 6:30 PM

Free and open to the public
Invite friends on Facebook here

205 Hudson Gallery
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013
Entrance on south side of Canal Street between Hudson and Watts

Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A. is the first exhibition of its kind to excavate histories of experimental art practice, collaboration, and exchange by a group of Los Angeles based queer Chicanx artists between the late 1960s and early 1990s. To highlight the New York iteration of Axis Mundo, Visual AIDS and the Hunter College Art Galleries host a guided talk and tour with an intergenerational group of creatives who knew artists highlighted in the exhibition or have been influenced by the artworks included in the show.

The Visual AIDS Talk + Tour of this landmark exhibition, curated by C. Ondine Chavoya and David Evans Frantz, will center the work of artists lost to AIDS-related complications with reflections by Simon Doonan on Mundo Meza (1955–1985) and Aldo Hernandez on Ray Navarro (1964–1990). To explore the intersections of art, AIDS and activism in the exhibition, the tour will also include comments by J. Soto, Lauren Argentina Zelaya and Alexandro Segade.

As noted in the AIDS Activism(s) section of the exhibition: “The devastation of the AIDS epidemic was acutely felt by intersecting Latinx and queer artist communities. In the face of government neglect, many artists politicized their practices, often taking inspiration from their earlier participation in gay and lesbian and Chicano rights movements. Working within community and advocacy groups, artists sought to raise awareness and educate through quickly produced and accessible mediums such as video and print material. Many artists memorialized those lost to the disease, while others took up their own mortality and disability as content for their work through abstraction and conceptual distance.”
Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A. is curated by C. Ondine Chavoya and David Evans Frantz and was organized by ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives at the USC Libraries in collaboration with The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, and is organized as a traveling exhibition by Independent Curators International (ICI). The presentation at the Hunter College Art Galleries has been organized in collaboration with Chief Curator Sarah Watson and Exhibitions Manager Jenn Bratovich.

Speaker Biographies

Simon Doonan is a writer, bon-vivant, window dresser extraordinaire and fashion commentator who has worked in fashion for over 35 years. Doonan has won many awards for his groundbreaking and unconventional window displays, including the CFDA Award. In 2009, he was invited by President and Ms. Obama to decorate the White House for the Holidays. Doonan describes his relationship with Mundo Meza: “I met Mundo in 1979. We became boyfriends for a couple of years, after which we remained close pals. We were also creative collaborators, working together on various window displays and videos.”

Cuban-American Aldo Hernández and Chicano Ray Navarro both honed their commitments to society through artistic projects in California and then re-located to NYC. Hernández landed jobs with MoMA and Creative Time, and while visiting LA in 1988 was introduced to Navarro at latin gay party Vasilon through a mutual friend from MoCA where Navarro worked. That June, Navarro moved to NY where they became close friends, AIDS activists, and Art+Positive collaborators until Navarro’s death in November 1990. During that summer, Hernández had begun DJing at the Clit Club & MEAT, where he melded a passion for the groove with graphics and photography as he dove into a life long calling of the sonic & visual. It was an urgent vital time in both their lives that remains powerfully conveyed through Navarro’s incisive art & writings focused on young queers of color.

Alexandro Segade is an interdisciplinary artist whose multimedia science fiction performances exploring queer futurity have been presented at the Broad Museum, REDCAT and LAXART, LA; Yerba Buena Center, San Francisco; Time-Based Arts Festival, Portland, Oregon; Movement Research/Judson Church, Park Avenue Armory, NYC, and Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, Bard College, NY. Since 2001, Segade has worked in the collective My Barbarian on exhibitions, videos and performance projects at venues including the New Museum, MoMA, The Kitchen, Participant Inc., NY; Museo El Eco, Mexico City; the Hammer Museum, LACMA, MoCA, Susanne Vielmetter Gallery, LA; the 2014 Whitney Biennial, Performa 05 and 07. Segade’s recent writing has been published in Yale’s Theater Journal and artforum.com, and he is cohost of the podcast Super Gay!

J. Soto is a queer brown transgender interdisciplinary artist, writer, and arts organizer. His collaborative writing project, “Ya Presente Ayer” can be found in Support Networks, Chicago Social Practice History Series (University of Chicago Press). His recent writing can be found in Original Plumbing and Apogee Journal: Queer History, Queer Now Folio and American Realness 2018: Reading. A Chicano raised in the San Francisco Bay Area, J. is interested in sex as an embodied way of learning queer history, the impact of AIDS on queer communities of artists and feeling loss through a racialized lens and through the portrayal of sensual bodies in Axis Mundo.

Lauren Argentina Zelaya is a cultural producer, curator, and museum educator based in Brooklyn, NY. As Assistant Curator of Public Programs at Brooklyn Museum, Zelaya curates and produces Target First Saturdays and other free and low-cost public programs that invite over 100,000 visitors a year to engage with special exhibitions and collections in new and unexpected ways. Lauren is committed to collaborating with emerging artists and centering voices in our communities that are often marginalized, with a focus on film and performance and creating programming for and with LGBTQ+, immigrant, and Caribbean communities. Recent projects she presented include Cuerpxs Radicales: Radical Bodies in Performance and Black Queer Brooklyn on Film. Known and respected equally for her nail art and her fierce commitment to bringing art and culture to the people, Lauren was named one of Brooklyn Magazine’s 30 Under 30 in 2018.

Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano LA / Thomas Allen Harris

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Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano LA

Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano LA is a traveling exhibition that explores the intersections among a network of over fifty artists. This historical exhibition is the first of its kind to excavate histories of experimental art practice, collaboration, and exchange by a group of Los Angeles-based queer Chicanx artists between the late 1960s and early 1990s. While the exhibition’s heart looks at the work of Chicanx artists in Los Angeles, it reveals extensive new research into the collaborative networks that connected these artists to one another and to artists from many different communities, cultural backgrounds, sexual orientations, and international urban centers, thus deepening and expanding narratives about the development of the Chicano Art Movement, performance art, and queer aesthetics and practices.

As referenced in its title, the exhibition also sheds light onto the work of Edmundo “Mundo” Meza (1955–1985), a central figure within his generation. Primarily a painter, but also known for his performances, design, and installation work, Meza collaborated with many of his peers towards developing new art practices amid emerging movements of political and social justice activism.

Axis Mundo presents over two decades of work—painting, performance ephemera, print material, video, music, fashion, and photography—in the context of significant artistic and cultural movements: mail art and artist correspondences; the rise of Chicanx, LGBTQ, and feminist print media; the formation of alternative spaces; fashion culture; punk music and performance; and artistic responses to the AIDS crisis. As a result of thorough curatorial research, Axis Mundo marks the first historical consideration and significant showing of many of these pioneering artists’ work.

Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Gallery
132 East 68th Street
New York, NY

and

205 Hudson Gallery
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY

Through August 19


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Thomas Allen Harris at Hunter East Harlem Gallery

Artist and Filmmaker Thomas Allen Harris is in collaboration with students from the Hunter College IMA MFA program to transform Hunter East Harlem Gallery into an open-forum classroom. During the months of July and August 2018, the students will cull material directly from the surrounding neighborhood, and each student will perform a site-based investigation using historical visual materials like family albums, vintage photographs, archival film, and personal narratives to develop a project. The final outcome will be a collaborative exhibition debuting inside the gallery during the month of September, opening on August 30, 2018.

The workshop curriculum is based on Thomas Allen Harris’ practice which utilizes the family album as a community organizing tool, inviting audiences to share personal histories through close looking of a photograph. These archival materials illuminate stories of the neighborhood’s narratives giving shape to a collective memory and a people’s history. In tandem with the participating students, Allen Harris will conduct his own investigation of the Harlem-based First AME Church: Bethel creating a visual dialogue where cultural, political, and spiritual themes collide. The project disrupts notions of art, history, and religion as monolithic institutions by examining the relational and communal aspects of worship and community sites.

 

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
2180 3rd Avenue at 119th Street
New York, NY

Workshop begins July 11, 2018

Exhibition opens August 30, 2018