News and Events

Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano LA / Thomas Allen Harris

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Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano LA

Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano LA is a traveling exhibition that explores the intersections among a network of over fifty artists. This historical exhibition is the first of its kind to excavate histories of experimental art practice, collaboration, and exchange by a group of Los Angeles-based queer Chicanx artists between the late 1960s and early 1990s. While the exhibition’s heart looks at the work of Chicanx artists in Los Angeles, it reveals extensive new research into the collaborative networks that connected these artists to one another and to artists from many different communities, cultural backgrounds, sexual orientations, and international urban centers, thus deepening and expanding narratives about the development of the Chicano Art Movement, performance art, and queer aesthetics and practices.

As referenced in its title, the exhibition also sheds light onto the work of Edmundo “Mundo” Meza (1955–1985), a central figure within his generation. Primarily a painter, but also known for his performances, design, and installation work, Meza collaborated with many of his peers towards developing new art practices amid emerging movements of political and social justice activism.

Axis Mundo presents over two decades of work—painting, performance ephemera, print material, video, music, fashion, and photography—in the context of significant artistic and cultural movements: mail art and artist correspondences; the rise of Chicanx, LGBTQ, and feminist print media; the formation of alternative spaces; fashion culture; punk music and performance; and artistic responses to the AIDS crisis. As a result of thorough curatorial research, Axis Mundo marks the first historical consideration and significant showing of many of these pioneering artists’ work.

Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Gallery
132 East 68th Street
New York, NY

and

205 Hudson Gallery
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY

Through August 19


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Thomas Allen Harris at Hunter East Harlem Gallery

Artist and Filmmaker Thomas Allen Harris is in collaboration with students from the Hunter College IMA MFA program to transform Hunter East Harlem Gallery into an open-forum classroom. During the months of July and August 2018, the students will cull material directly from the surrounding neighborhood, and each student will perform a site-based investigation using historical visual materials like family albums, vintage photographs, archival film, and personal narratives to develop a project. The final outcome will be a collaborative exhibition debuting inside the gallery during the month of September, opening on August 30, 2018.

The workshop curriculum is based on Thomas Allen Harris’ practice which utilizes the family album as a community organizing tool, inviting audiences to share personal histories through close looking of a photograph. These archival materials illuminate stories of the neighborhood’s narratives giving shape to a collective memory and a people’s history. In tandem with the participating students, Allen Harris will conduct his own investigation of the Harlem-based First AME Church: Bethel creating a visual dialogue where cultural, political, and spiritual themes collide. The project disrupts notions of art, history, and religion as monolithic institutions by examining the relational and communal aspects of worship and community sites.

 

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
2180 3rd Avenue at 119th Street
New York, NY

Workshop begins July 11, 2018

Exhibition opens August 30, 2018

 

 

5 Questions, 5 Minutes / Dini Dixon / BFA and MFA Thesis Shows Closing This Week


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5 Questions, 5 Minutes: Artist Talk with Yasmin Ramirez

part of QUEENIE: Selected artworks by female artists from El Museo del Barrio’s Collection

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
2180 3rd Avenue
New York, NY

May 30, 6:30pm

Please join us and El Museo del Barrio for a rapid fire Q & A session: 5 Question in 5 Minutes, featuring the following artists from QUEENIE: Selected artworks by female artists from El Museo del Barrio’s Collection:

Melissa Calderón
Alessandra Expósito
iliana emilia garcia
Scherezade Garcia
Jessica Kairé
Glendalys Medina
Nitza Tufiño

Artists will answer questions from both audience members and those submitted via social media. The artist talk will be moderated by Yasmin Ramirez.


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Dini Dixon: The Long Goodbye

Thomas Hunter Project Space
Thomas Hunter Building
68th Street and Lexington Avenue
New York, NY

May 29 – June 20
Opening Reception: June 1, 6-9pm

“The Long Goodbye is an installation made up of an abstract video accompanied by a series of wavelike sculptures. By recording the movements I make while producing sculptures I create a stop motion video sequence that allows the viewer to follow aspects of my process. I also repeat steps to emphasize the rythmic movements that happen within the act of making. My videos intend to subvert the stoic nature of fired clay by presenting it a digital format that affords constant movement. I am also interested in using the temporal, fluid characteristics of video as a reference to identity as a constantly moving and evolving aspect of our lives. The images I produce represent the projection of masculine identity and explore the themes of power, coolness, strength, and what it means to be heroic. Breaking with the tradition of the male gaze commonly represented in art history, I am depicting masculinity from a voyeristic female gaze. Through this process I seek to superimpose a feminine dialogue over macho imagery I was influenced by growing up in California.”


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Jessica Perelman & Jackie Slanley: Opulent Feelings

Thomas Hunter Project Space Hallway Show
Thomas Hunter Building
68th Street and Lexington Avenue
New York, NY

May 29 – June 20
Opening Reception: June 1, 6-9pm

Clay is a material inseparably tied to its functionality, used to form everything from coffee cups and industrial materials to costly and precious objects of desire. Within the field of sculpture, clay can appear weighed down by this inherent relationship. Instead of looking past this condition, artists Jackie Slanley and Jessica Perelman employ the utilitarian connotations surrounding clay to reinforce a narrative centered on opulence and freedom to desire from an unrelentingly feminine perspective.

Their paired works appear in strong contrast visually, but what they have in common sparks an expressive dialogue about the relationship between “low” and “high” art. Referencing everything from domestic items and thrifted curios, to porcelain figurines, glass beads, and fur. Their approaches are united by a distinct attention to texture and a draw towards extravagance and ornate detail. By joining painterly surfaces with ceramic form as well as incorporating two dimensional and installation elements, both artists are working to challenge the boundaries between painting, drawing, and ceramics. Their two versions of rebellion reject unspoken rules and work together to demonstrate the benefits self-governance.


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Michael Fujita Closing / Yasmin Ramirez / MFA and BFA Thesis Exhibitions

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Michael Fujita: Spring Forward, Closing May 25

Thomas Hunter Project Space
Thomas Hunter Building
68th Street and Lexington Avenue
New York, NY

Thomas Hunter Project Space is proud to present Spring Forward, a solo exhibition featuring new work by Michael Fujita:

Visual instances trigger personal interest and curiosity, which serves as beginnings of pieces.  Through various processes, materials, and the element of time, those visual triggers take on new meaning and identity as objects.  Color plays a critical role in my work transforming the assumed identity even further to a playful offering of my perception.”


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5 Questions, 5 Minutes: Artist Talk with Yasmin Ramirez

part of QUEENIE: Selected artworks by female artists from El Museo del Barrio’s Collection

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
2180 3rd Avenue
New York, NY

May 30, 6:30pm

Please join us and El Museo del Barrio for a rapid fire Q & A session: 5 Question in 5 Minutes, featuring the following artists from QUEENIE: Selected artworks by female artists from El Museo del Barrio’s Collection:

Melissa Calderón
Alessandra Expósito
iliana emilia garcia
Scherezade Garcia
Jessica Kairé
Glendalys Medina
Nitza Tufiño

Artists will answer questions from both audience members and those submitted via social media. The artist talk will be moderated by Yasmin Ramirez.

 


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WOTY 2.3: Ojalá

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
2180 3rd Avenue
New York, NY

May 17 – June 30

Ojalá is a project by Mexican-American artists Mauricio Cortes Ortega and Maria de Los Angeles. Both artists immigrated to the United States in their early childhood and make work that deals with identity and migration. Under the current Presidency, migrants from Mexico have been singled out and targeted through verbal and legal attacks. Roughly 700,000 young immigrants have been fighting to maintain their status Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals act. The lives of this generation of citizens has been threatened recently as the current administration has fought to end DACA, resulting in deporting thousands of young people to countries where they may or may not have family, friends, or be able to continue their careers. Further, a new wall along the Mexico-United States border has been proposed as way to keep out future generations of immigrants. The wall acts as a visual manifestation of xenophobia and acts as a personification of separation.

Ojalá, which roughly translates to “hopefully” is a project that imagines the wall as a liminal space. The drawings of de Los Angeles portray migration, figures striving for a better future and hope for humanity. Cortes Ortega’s ceramic sculptures reference capirotes, a Spanish headdress dating back to the Inquisition, which in their reinterpretation reference the inevitable transformation of objects due to colonialism and immigration. The sculptures set against de Los Angeles’ drawings suggest a dialogue between the origins of contemporary issues surrounding immigration and the current ramifications of negotiating the U.S. Mexico border.

BFA Thesis Exhibition / WOTY 2.3: Ojalá / MFA Thesis Exhibition

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WOTY 2.3: Ojalá

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
2180 3rd Avenue
New York, NY

May 17 – June 30

Ojalá is a project by Mexican-American artists Mauricio Cortes Ortega and Maria de Los Angeles. Both artists immigrated to the United States in their early childhood and make work that deals with identity and migration. Under the current Presidency, migrants from Mexico have been singled out and targeted through verbal and legal attacks. Roughly 700,000 young immigrants have been fighting to maintain their status Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals act. The lives of this generation of citizens has been threatened recently as the current administration has fought to end DACA, resulting in deporting thousands of young people to countries where they may or may not have family, friends, or be able to continue their careers. Further, a new wall along the Mexico-United States border has been proposed as way to keep out future generations of immigrants. The wall acts as a visual manifestation of xenophobia and acts as a personification of separation.

Ojalá, which roughly translates to “hopefully” is a project that imagines the wall as a liminal space. The drawings of de Los Angeles portray migration, figures striving for a better future and hope for humanity. Cortes Ortega’s ceramic sculptures reference capirotes, a Spanish headdress dating back to the Inquisition, which in their reinterpretation reference the inevitable transformation of objects due to colonialism and immigration. The sculptures set against de Los Angeles’ drawings suggest a dialogue between the origins of contemporary issues surrounding immigration and the current ramifications of negotiating the U.S. Mexico border.


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Tania Bruguera / Carol Squiers / MFA Thesis Part II

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Tania Bruguera, Zabar Visiting Artist Lecture

Hunter MFA Studios, Flex Space
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY

May 9, 7pm

RSVP here

The Hunter College Department of Art and Art History is pleased toannounce a public lecture by Tania Bruguera, the Spring 2018 Judith Zabar Visiting Artist. Wednesday, May 9, 2018, at 7:00 pm at Hunter’s MFA Studiosat 205 Hudson Street in Tribeca.

For over 25 years Tania Bruguera has created socially engaged performances and installations that examine the nature of political power structures and their effect on the lives of their constituencies. Her research focuses on ways in which art can be applied to everyday political life, and on the transformation of social affect into political effectiveness. Her long-term projects are intensive interventions on the institutional structure of collective memory, education, and politics. Her works often expose the social effects of political forces and present global issues of power, migration, censorship, and repression through participatory works that turn “viewers” into “citizens.”

By creating proposals and aesthetic models for others to use and adapt, she defines herself as an initiator rather than an author, and often collaborates with multiple institutions as well as many individuals so that the full realization of her artwork occurs when others adopt and perpetuate it.

Tania Bruguera has been awarded an honorary doctorate by The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, selected one of the 100 Leading Global Thinkers by Foreign Policy magazine, and was shortlisted for the #Index100 Freedom of Expression Award. She is a Herb Alpert Award winner, and has been a Guggenheim, Radcliffe and Yale World Fellow. She was the
first artist-in-residence in the New York City Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs. Bruguera has recently opened the Hannah Arendt International Institute for Artivism, in Havana: a school, exhibition space, and think tank for activist artists and Cubans.


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Michael Fujita: Spring Forward

Thomas Hunter Project Space
Thomas Hunter Building
68th Street and Lexington Avenue
New York, NY

Through May 25
Opening Reception: May 11, 6-8pm

Thomas Hunter Project Space is proud to present Spring Forward, a solo exhibition featuring new work by Michael Fujita:

Visual instances trigger personal interest and curiosity, which serves as beginnings of pieces.  Through various processes, materials, and the element of time, those visual triggers take on new meaning and identity as objects.  Color plays a critical role in my work transforming the assumed identity even further to a playful offering of my perception.”


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Alessandra Expósito in Conversation with her Therapist

part of QUEENIE: Selected artworks by female artists from El Museo del Barrio’s Collection

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
2180 3rd Avenue
New York, NY

May 17, 7pm

Join us as artist Alessandra Expósito and her “Licensed” Psychotherapist explore recurring themes in her paintings, sculptures and dreams including common childhood maladies, girly animal trophies, pet names for dogs, and the joy of eBay©. The looming spectre of death haunts her work while a lifelong love affair with hypochondria lightens the proceedings.